Friends of Falmouth Dogs - Celebrating 20 Years in 2010.
 
Join our mailing list Save The Mutts
View our Alumni Photo Gallery
 

Current hours
Sunday: 3:00-5:00
Monday and Thursday:
10:00-12:00 & 4:00-6:00
Tues.,Wed.,Fri., & Sat.:
10:00-12:00

location
Animal Control Center
150 Blacksmith Shop Rd.
Falmouth, MA

Send mail to:
P.O. Box 438
Falmouth, MA 02541

phone number
508-548-7742
 

Follow us on Facebook

RSS Web Feed

Links To Other Sites

 
Photo of area around the Friends of Falmouth Dogs/Animal Control building.
Home Our Dogs About Us Adopt a Dog Directions How to Help FFD Items Navigation Bar

Recent Falmouth Enterprise Columns


September 15, 2017
September 8, 2017
September 1, 2017
August 25, 2017

August 18, 2017
August 11, 2017
August 4, 2017
July 28, 2017

 

Falmouth Enterprise Archived Column

By Pamela Alden Kokmeyer

Friday, September 15, 2017

The inventories maintained by the officers of the wardrobe for Henry VIII (and we can be pretty sure that these officers were accurate because we all know what happened to people who crossed the king), show that at least 158 dog collars were commissioned for the royal pets. And these were not ordinary collars. They were as lavish as the king's personal wardrobe: the collars were made of cloth of gold and velvet and richly decorated with scallop shells and roses.

The leashes might be silver or even silk, dyed in the Tudor colors of white and green. So, if any of his dogs went missing, they were certain to be recognized and returned. And a favorite of his, a spaniel named Cutte, was known to wander. And of course, this was way before microchipping.

Although we don't have 158 dogs needing collars, we do have some wonderful dogs nevertheless.

Rookie and Dusty both wait patiently to start new chapters in their lives. And neither cares if their collars are made of cloth of gold or velvet. Anything that carries an ID tag displaying their new family's name and number is all they want.

Dusty is a small, wire-haired, energetic, self-confident little guy. We think he's 6 years old. We think he's part mini-schnauzer. We think he's had some training. But we know he's special. He loves people and enjoys playing with other dogs, although he sometimes gets a bit overexcited. He loves to walk and has the energy typical of the terrier breed. He also has the curiosity of the terrier breed. His favorite speed is full-steam ahead.

Sharing the shelter with him is Rookie, the young Lab, who is the quintessential bull in a china shop. We don't think Rookie had a lot of interaction or guidance in his formative years. The result is he still acts like a really active toddler in a teenager's gangly body. He's big and clumsy and full of curiosity. He will need training and routine and lots of exercise. But he enjoys the company of people, especially tennis-ball-throwing people. Although large and boisterous, Rookie has an insecure side and likes to carry soft toys in his mouth on his walks. How cute is that? We're looking for a home for Rookie where someone is around a good deal of the time.

Not ready to adopt but looking for a little "Lab" in your life? We would consider foster care for Rookie while he waits for his forever home. We are specifically looking for a foster home with large breed experience that can work on his house manners in order to prepare him for a permanent home. We will also provide training for the foster family.

And you may have noticed Pinto by his absence. By the time this column goes to press, Pinto will likely be starting his brand-new life in his brand-new home.

Watch this column (and our website) as we expect to have some new dogs joining our census in the next few weeks. We'll keep you posted.

* * *

October is adopt a shelter dog month and there's no reason to wait until the last minute to celebrate. Now, we know that not everyone can adopt a shelter pet (and if you already have, please accept our gratitude), but there are other ways to help.

Donate: No shelter can exist without funds. Money is needed to provide full veterinary care, flea/tick and heartworm preventives, prescribed medicines, the right food (including special diets), crates, collars and leashes, laundry detergent, trash bags, paper goods, nutritional supplements and storage. Your contribution, no matter how small, helps keep a shelter running.

Volunteer: The daily tasks are numerous. Dogs need to be walked, laundry needs to be done, floors needed to be cleaned, landscaping needs to be maintained, clerical tasks need to be completed. But even if you cannot cover a regular shift, you might want to help at our outreach and fundraising events. Or better: create a fundraising event of your own! Please consider helping us help the dogs.

* * *

When you walk, with or without a dog, there is another way you can help the shelter. If you download the app Walk For A Dog, and choose Friends of Falmouth Dogs as your shelter, Wooftrax will send us a check based on the number of people walking for us. It asks for your dog's name when you sign up and every time you walk it lists your dog's name. If you don't have a dog, you can enter the name of one of our shelter dogs.

* * *

Please join us for our 4th annual Antiques Appraisal on Saturday, September 16, at Atria Woodbriar Place on Gifford Street from 1 to 3 PM. Bring your treasures, and Michael Kasparian will give you an estimate of their worth (and a bit of context as well). All proceeds benefit our medical fund. Price is $10 per item and three items for $25. Light refreshments will be served.

* * *

We are at the shelter Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to noon; Sunday from 3 to 5 PM; and Monday and Thursday afternoons from 4 to 6.

 

Back to the top.

 
 
 

Falmouth Enterprise Archived Column

By Pamela Alden Kokmeyer

Friday, September 1, 2017

You could read Wordsworth. Pore over Thoreau. Giggle with Dr. Seuss. And if you're lucky, all that reading, poring and giggling might help you get back to nature. Teach you how to keep it simple. How to enjoy the journey.

Or you could just hang out with your dog, who will show you how to do all that and have fun at the same time.

We know because we hang out with dogs. Shelter dogs. Our dogs. Friends' dogs. And all these dogs know how it's done. We keep learning from these dogs.

And we have three pretty good teachers at the shelter just waiting to show you how to keep it simple and enjoy the journey.

Dusty, a mix of possibly Yorkie and mini schnauzer, had a little surprise for us. During his recent vet visit, his age guesstimate was lowered a bit, so he's likely younger than 8. His teeth are very good, and he seems all-around healthy. And Dusty will soon have another surprise for us when he has his "day of beauty." We know a handsome little fella lurks under those wild curls! Dusty weighs about 12 pounds but will fill out a bit with regular meals and regular exercise.

Sometimes we let the dogs roam around the shelter. Some of them might choose to curl up in the office bed, some choose to help themselves to the toy box. Others look for biscuit crumbs or the unfinished meals of their kennel compadres. But not Pinto. He prefers to follow a volunteer from room to room. That volunteer might be washing dishes. Or changing water buckets. Or folding towels. Or any number of little chores. You look around, and there he is, just gazing all the way up at you (he's very small, you understand, so everything is all the way up). Watching. Watching.

Pinto is a black-and-white Chihuahua mix and a very curious little creature. About 8 years old, he's happy, nimble and quick. He can be a little grabby with toys but we're working on that. He loves people, attention, walks, blankets, dinner and toys, in no particular order. The accompanying photo shows him during his recent visit to Woods Hole. He had a terrific time exploring the waterfront, greeting passersby and generally enjoying the sun and attention.

And then we have Rookie, an all-around nice Lab. This young adult has a very nice temperament and although he loves to be around people, he is not pushy or obnoxious in seeking constant attention. He will chase after balls and return them—we're working on the release part!—and then might just find a shady spot to lie down in and observe the goings-on around him.

He is learning nice leash manners and enjoys his walks. Rookie needs a home where someone is around a lot and will give him the exercise he needs and the love he deserves.

* * *

We know that the devastation in Texas has been on everyone's mind and we are gladdened by the responses of help that have been pouring into the battered region. But it will be a very long, very hard road ahead, and the need for assistance, both material and financial, will go on for quite a while.

A large and well-organized response from this area was initiated by Paws New England for animals left homeless by the floods. They contacted shelters in our area asking for donations that they could transport to Texas. Our contact, Michelle Hall, choreographed the efforts locally, and we helped load her vehicle with food, bedding and crates. Her crew drove straight through and delivered all the precious items to shelters in the affected areas.

Much of what we loaded onto the truck was generously donated by Waquoit Feed & Garden and Uptown Dog Cape Cod in West Falmouth.

Also stepping up to the plate locally was Petco, which donated more than 30 large bags of premium dog food.

But we know the needs will go on for a very long time.

* * *

We remind you to check our website or give us a call because our census can and does change quickly and without notice. Dogs enter our program, dogs get adopted, and more dogs arrive. The variety is always enchanting.

* * *

And don't forget our 4th Annual Antique Appraisal fundraiser planned for Saturday, September 16, from 1 to 3 PM at Atria Woodbriar Place on Gifford Street. All proceeds benefit our medical fund. It's always a fun event. You can have your special antiques appraised for $10 per item or $25 for three items. And the refreshments are plentiful and wonderful. Please try to join us.

* * *

We are at the shelter Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to noon; Sunday from 3 to 5 PM; and Monday and Thursday afternoons from 4 to 6.

 

Back to the top.

 
 
 

Falmouth Enterprise Archived Column

By Pamela Alden Kokmeyer

Friday, September 1, 2017

Speaking of the eclipse, you might be surprised to learn that we have a little eclipse of our own going on at the shelter. Remember we told you how cute Pinto was? Well, he may just have been eclipsed by another little darlin' named Dusty. Yeah, we thought that would be impossible, too, but there you have it.

And you also may be surprised to learn that modern horse racing can trace its roots to a legendary horse named, you guessed it: Eclipse.

This English racehorse's star ascended around 1769. And he was fast. Very fast. Some reports clocked his speed at 83 feet per second, covering 25 feet in a single stride.

And what's really, really remarkable is that in all regards, he was an average horse and his speed could be credited to his very "averageness." Experts at the Royal Veterinary College in London studied his skeleton (which is on display at the same college) and discovered that what gives a horse its speed is the ability to bring its legs forward quickly. Longer limbs on bigger horses are harder to move forward; shorter limbs—or average limbs—can move more quickly. Hence the speed. Hence the winning. Hence the trophies. So let's hear it for the average among us!

Except there's nothing average about our three residents: Pinto, Dusty and Rookie.

Pinto, the black-and-white-patterned Chihuahua, is getting very accustomed to being everyone's favorite lap dog. He will stare at you until you lift him into your lap. Then he'll look out at an admiring audience with his eyes half-closed, enjoying the attention. But all of this attention comes after he has had his walk.

You see, Pinto loves to walk. He willingly lets you put his little purple harness on his little limbs and attach his little leash and off you both go. Legs prancing high, tail even higher. Pinto is probably around 8 years old or so. He seems to really enjoy the company of the other dogs, especially Rookie, but because he's so small and Rookie's so big, we are introducing them carefully.

The eclipsing Dusty we just introduced above is beyond cute. Maybe part Yorkie, maybe part mini schnauzer, he is all whiskery terrier. Well, right now he's sort of wildly whiskery but after his day at the spa next week, he'll be stunning. This little guy, about 8 years old at a guess, is simply sweetness personified.

He is very people-oriented (in fact, all three dogs at the shelter are very people-oriented) and also enjoys his walks. He doesn't seem to be too interested in toys just yet, but that may come. Sometimes a little shy, he loves lying in the sun while he waits for volunteers to finish all their more prosaic duties, but when he sees the leash, he comes alive. He, too, loves his walks. Afterward, you'll find him curled against your legs, where he must feel very safe and loved.

Rounding out our trio is Rookie, everyone's favorite Lab. This solid, happy guy has so much potential. He seems housebroken, is learning how to walk nicely on a leash, and will chase tennis balls until the cows come home. He'd probably chase the cows, too, but we can't know for sure. Although he adores attention, he is not obnoxious about it. He is content to sit near you while you chat with a friend or knit something. Or even read a book. It's being in your orbit that is important to him.

Rookie is a bit chunky and needs to lose some weight. That will come with regular exercise. The ideal home for Rookie will be an active one where someone is around much of the time or someone who can take him to work with them. Because he's a bit clumsy about grabbing toys, a home with older children or teenagers would be best.

* * *

Did you know that your dog can suffer the "back-to-school blues"? All of a sudden, your pet's routine has shifted dramatically and that can be hard, especially on sensitive dogs. But there are some simple ways to ease your dog—and your family's routine with the dog—into settled waters.

1) Begin the new school routine before school starts. Perhaps set your alarm earlier and get your dog out for a bathroom break or walk that will mimic a school-time scenario. Repeat at the end of the day. New mealtimes may also have to be observed, so it's best to do that gradually.

2) Plan to factor in enough exercise, both in the mornings and the evenings. And a double benefit for the whole family is the chance to talk about everyone's day while you're out walking.

3) Give them something to exercise their minds—puzzle toys or games. Also, leaving a radio on tuned to soft music will help fill some silent hours. Hiring a dog walker is also a good option.

4) And this last tip goes for any time you leave the home and return. Stay calm and try not to smother your dog with attention. Let him or her know that your leaving and returning are perfectly normal and can be relied on.

* * *

We are at the shelter Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to noon; Sunday from 3 to 5 PM; and Monday and Thursday afternoons from 4 to 6.

Back to the top.

 
 
 

Falmouth Enterprise Archived Column

By Pamela Alden Kokmeyer

Friday, August 25, 2017

An open door. A clap of thunder. A squirrel skittering across the yard. Any of these could be an instant invitation for a dog to bolt from the house. Or the reason could be something else entirely. But when a dog bolts, it doesn't matter what the cause is. The only thing that matters is getting the dog back safely. And quickly. Even the most vigilant among us can't control everything in the environment, but we can control whether or not our dog is tagged. (In fact, earlier this week, three dogs arrived as strays within an hour's time frame. None had ID tags.) Please make sure your dog is wearing an ID tag with a number where you can be reached. Rabies tags are little help if the dog goes missing after a vet's office is closed.

* * *

OK. Preaching over. Now on to the fun stuff: Pinto and Rookie.

Pinto is so cute that if aliens landed in the desert and wanted to know the definition of cute, we'd show them this little dog. He's probably mostly Chihuahua, but he may also have some pug, or Boston terrier, or even Jack Russell terrier mixed in there somewhere. Black and white (hence the name), quite small but very lively, this little guy is a sponge for attention and affection.

He loves to walk and keeps up a good steady pace. He also loves to hang in the office. By the time this column goes to press, we will have a complete vet report—and age guestimate—on him.

Rookie is our kinda-brand-new resident. He's a light brownish/tannish, youngish Lab. We're still getting to know him but we already see how sweet and people-oriented he is. His favorite forms of exercise seem to be chasing tennis balls and seeing how many stuffed dollies he can put in his mouth at once. He has pretty good leash manners and appears to be housebroken. So far, he's proven to be a terrific dog with a stable temperament.

Because both of these dogs crave attention, we will be looking for homes where someone is around a lot of the time.

* * *

The number of dogs described above in no way reflects a static census. In the past few months, the number of strays we've handled has remained pretty high. The lucky ones (with ID tags) were with us briefly until worried owners were contacted and rushed to the shelter. Now might be a good time to reread the opening paragraph.

* * *

As a courtesy listing on our website, we have posted Nala, a year-old husky mix. Nala, who is still in her own home, needs a new home. She is shy, fearful and suffers from separation anxiety. Nala will need a quiet, patient home where someone is around much of the time and will give her the exercise and attention she needs. If you'd like more information, give us a call and we'll put you in touch with the owner.

* * *

We'd like to take a moment to express our very deep gratitude to the Robert D. and Shirlee G. Burd Animal Welfare Fund of The Cape Cod Foundation, which has awarded us a generous amount to help us continue our mission. The Burds' love of animals, both domestic and wild, and their concern for their welfare is made clear in their bequest to us and other animal advocacy agencies. We honor the Burds as we use their donation for the benefit of the dogs in our care.

* * *

We hope you'll join us on Saturday, September 16, for our 4th annual Antique Appraisal event. Atria Woodbriar Place on Gifford Street is hosting the fundraiser (and providing great refreshments), and Michael Kasparian is conducting the appraisals, with a bit of historical context thrown in for good measure. The event runs from 1 to 3. Cost is $10 per item, and three items for $25. Because the venue and the appraisals are being donated, all proceeds will benefit our medical fund. Veterinary costs are by far our largest expense.

Back to the top.

 
 
 

Falmouth Enterprise Archived Column

By Catriona Garry

Friday, August 18, 2017

The best part about living on Cape Cod is the community feeling in each neighborhood. This past Sunday, August 13, a Teaticket neighborhood was treated to the 7th Annual Great Bay Dog Show.

This year's show was in memory of Monte, the beloved Maltese of Winnifred Andreasen, who lives in that neighborhood. There were 22 dogs that strutted their stuff on the runway, and first- and second-place awards were given out for cuteness, obedience and talent.

Claire Cahir, a sophomore at the University of Notre Dame, hosted the event, and it raised $527! Thank you, Claire and neighbors, for your generosity to Friends of Falmouth Dogs.

That amazing success proves not only that Falmouth has some of the best dogs around, but also that a community is stronger when it works together.

* * *

Receiving support is always appreciated, and this week Friends of Falmouth Dogs would like to show its gratitude to Uptown Dog Cape Cod for its ongoing support and donations, as well as for the coupons for our adoption packets, which will put a free ID tag on each adopted dog's collar.

FFD would also like to extend its thanks to Lisa McGillicuddy and the children in her Summer of Service program at First Congregational Church of Falmouth for dropping off homemade dog cookies. They were enjoyed by our furry residents!

* * *

Hurricane season is in full swing, and it is never too late to create an emergency plan for your family and pets. August and September are prime months for hurricanes to hit New England. Being prepared is important, especially when owning animals. The ASPCA urges pet owners to remember that during natural disasters the safest place for your pet is with you. If you and your family are required to evacuate, bring your pet!

In your emergency plan, make sure to note nearby shelters that accept pets (Falmouth High School is an emergency shelter that allows pets). Prepare carriers in advance with your pet's favorite toys and treats to create a familiar and safe environment and help ease some anxiety for your pet. It is a good idea to have travel kits with food, water, medications, bedding, et cetera. Create an emergency contact list, which should include your veterinarian, and keep it someplace accessible. If your pet gets lost, identification tags and microchips will help reunite you sooner.

* * *

Friends of Falmouth Dogs is open Monday to Saturday from 10 AM to noon; also from 4 to 6 PM on Monday and Thursday; and on Sunday from 3 to 5 PM.

 

Back to the top.

 
 
 

Falmouth Enterprise Archived Column

By Catriona Garry

Friday, August 11, 2017

For those who do not remember me from last summer, my name is Catriona Garry.

I was a guest columnist last summer for the Friends of Falmouth Dogs column. I am a Falmouth resident and a third-year student at Lasell College in Newton and I volunteer at Friends of Falmouth Dogs during my summer and winter breaks. I am only two weeks away from heading to Lugano, Switzerland, to study abroad for the fall semester. Since there isn't a dog shelter in Lugano, I must get my dog fix from FFD for as long as I can!

Talking about Friends of Falmouth Dogs, many of you readers will remember George, the sweet German shepherd who made an incredible journey in the past five months. George has been adopted and is settling nicely into his forever home. His "proud mom" has kept FFD up to date with George's transition. Getting into a daily routine, George is thriving and is bringing much happiness to his new family as "he loves everyone and everyone loves him—he is the star of the family for sure!"

* * *

Be sure to check our website often to see what dogs we have available for adoption or give us a call during our open hours.

* * *

Friends of Falmouth Dogs has some upcoming events to watch out for. On September 16, there is an Antique Appraisal at Atria Woodbriar Place on Gifford Street. Items will be appraised by Michael Kasparian.

Keep an eye out for the rabies clinic in October. Dates and times will be published in future columns as the time gets closer.

Also in October there is the Cape Cod Marathon on the 29th. Look for Friends of Falmouth Dogs volunteers at a water stop along the marathon route.

To get into the holiday spirit, there will be photos with Santa on December 2 at Waquoit Congregational Church. Bring your pet for a personal picture with the jolly man himself. (Thanks, Joe Yukna!)

* * *

As always, Friends of Falmouth Dogs is open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to noon; Sunday from 3 to 5 PM, and on Monday and Thursday from 4 to 6 PM.

 

Back to the top.

 
 
 

Falmouth Enterprise Archived Column

By Pamela Alden Kokmeyer

Friday, August 4, 2017

Some of the dogs that pass through our shelter come and go in a moment, producing barely a ripple. Especially the young, healthy, happy, popular breeds.

Others offer a challenge. But it is this challenge that can be their greatest gift to us and their greatest legacy. They make us stop and reassess. They make us try even harder. They make us think creatively. They open up new horizons, which in turn will help other dogs down the road.

Maybe we don't say it often enough, but we'll say it here and now: We are grateful for all those dogs that have given us the best that they have. We hope we lived up to their expectations.

* * *

UPDATE: Sis was adopted! And now we turn to our newest resident: Sis. Sis is a 9-year-old English springer spaniel. She is pretty to look at and fun to be with. Sis loves people. Sis loves having her teeth brushed. Every morning. Wow.

Her pretty liver-colored coat waves gently when she trots. Sis can be particular about hanging out with some other dogs and she is particularly not fond of small dogs. But that's an issue that can be handled with a bit of care and foresight. We are still getting to know Sis and are looking forward to having fun with her.

* * *

We're excited to share some wonderful news: George and Cloud have both been adopted. For Cloud, it was an easy-peasy sojourn in our program; no major health issues and scores of families interested. For George, not so much. You may recall some of George's dramatic story, which included treatment for a very serious medical issue (heartworm). You may also remember he went into foster care, where he almost literally found a new life. We wanted to share what his foster family says of their experience. They say it more eloquently than we ever could:

Thank you to everyone who asked "How's George?" We have progressed from answering "very sick" to "he is fabulous and in his forever home!"

George captured so many hearts at the shelter that it was bittersweet for the Friends of Falmouth Dogs volunteers as they packed George up for his next adventure into foster care. The FFD volunteers reluctantly parted with George because they knew he needed a home where he could continue to recover from his many ailments and gather strength for his heartworm treatment.

George got in the car, lay down and quietly gazed out the window for the ride "home." That was my first WOW: he was so good in the car. George continued to give us WOW moments as he transformed from a very sick dog to a healthy, happy, mellow dog. We learned that George would rather play with us than his toy bunny and that dogs are no big deal, including a jumping, licking puppy or a frantically running, barking dog. He likes to sleep in and would spend hours chewing a frozen marrow bone on the deck. George saves his deep, impressive barks for squirrels, crows and fireworks. George learned that some people are easily trained to give treats as long as he takes the treats gently.

The next question after how George is doing is usually how can we give him up. It's not easy, but we aren't the perfect match for George and we know that George is now in his perfect forever home. We have fostered a few dogs over the years and have never wondered how the dog is doing because we know that the Friends of Falmouth Dogs volunteers work hard, and succeed, at finding the perfect match for each dog. Providing foster care for George was an incredibly rewarding experience that outweighs the sadness as he drove away.

That is my segue to encourage anyone who loves dogs, but can't make a full-time commitment to a dog, to consider foster care. If you have ever thought, "I would love to have a dog but ... I want to travel ... or I can't make the financial commitment..." consider foster care. As it should be, the application process is thorough, but once the volunteers get to know you, they remember you and couldn't be more appreciative. By definition, a dog that needs foster care often has issues, maybe medical, maybe emotional, maybe age-related. But FFD volunteers make sure that the dog's issues will not exceed the foster home's capabilities.

We were a good choice for George because we, among other things, have a quiet place with someone home all day, some dog nutrition expertise, and many years of dog experience.

Before I get off my soapbox I need to mention heartworm.

George is the second dog we have fostered through heartworm treatment, and it is really tough to watch. It is a very expensive six-week process of painful injections that make the dog really sick. On the other hand, heartworm prevention is a relatively inexpensive, once-a-month, liver-flavored treat.

Please choose prevention.

* * *

And from the bottom of every volunteer's heart, we express a huge thank-you to this foster family who saw George through the dark times and into his future.

* * *

We are at the shelter Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to noon; Sunday from 3 to 5 PM; and Monday and Thursday afternoons from 4 to 6.

 
 

Back to the top.

 
 
 

Falmouth Enterprise Archived Column

By Pamela Alden Kokmeyer

Friday, July 28, 2017

We all love an underdog. We root for him. We cheer for her. We celebrate when they overcome the odds.

Like David and Goliath.

Like the US Men's Hockey Team at the 1980 Winter Olympics.

Like Rocky.

And Rocky II.

And Rocky III... (You get the picture.)

UPDATE: George has been adopted. And like George. When he first arrived, there was so much wrong with his body, yet so much right with his temperament. While there was never a whiff of defeatism with this 7-year-old German shepherd—he was too dignified for that—there was an aura of sadness in his expression, no doubt as a result of all the neglect that he had endured.

But then he turned to us. And we turned to a foster family. And the rest, as they say, is history. George is now ready for the next chapter of his life, from Underdog to Wonderdog. He's healthy and whole and has joy in his eyes. And every day we learn something new about him. George is ready for his forever home.

UPDATE: Cloud has been adopted. Those of us of a certain age will remember the day The Beatles first set foot on American soil and were greeted by 3,000 screaming fans. That's sort of what Cloud experienced this past the weekend—except for the screaming. We were amazed at the number of people who came to see this little Maltese with the shaggy coat. And we now have a number of wonderful applications for Cloud. Apparently, Malteses have a very devoted fan base.

But that's easy to understand with Cloud. This 8-year-old dog has a sweet temperament, loves people, enjoys high-stepping walks, and enjoys laps even more. Because of his small size (8½ pounds), we think he'd do best in an adult home. Maltese experience will be a plus.

However, if you're still interested in Cloud or another small dog, please call and ask to be put on a waiting list or stop by and complete our potential applicant form and we will keep it on file for up to six months.

* * *

And just a reminder: we regularly receive alerts about dogs needing new homes, so we encourage you to stop by, chat with us and let us know if you're starting your search for a dog. Who knows? We may be able to help.

* * *

If you have been trying, unsuccessfully, to master the art of raising your left eyebrow to deepen the bond with your dog, we have a few more ideas that may be easier to implement. They are not radical thoughts, simply gentle suggestions. Obvious as these ideas may be, they're still worth repeating.

Obedience training. Yes, we know, that's a no-brainer. But part of the beauty of mastering basic commands is that not only will you have a dog that understands sit, stay and come, your dog will learn to rely on you for leadership and security. And you and your dog may be able to go on to training for the Canine Good Citizen test. Find a good trainer and get started.

Trick training. Not at all the same as obedience. This should be pure fun, both to learn and to perform. Things like shaking hands, rolling over, twirling on back legs, playing dead, and counting to three. The possibilities are endless. Classes, books and videos are good resources.

Exercise. Exercise. Exercise. (Did you notice the emphasis?) Walking, hiking, jogging, swimming, and exploring trails and even neighborhoods will not only provide the health benefits your dog needs, but also offer some shared time away from the stresses of daily life. And your dog will simply love all the new and exotic scents in the environment.

* * *

We thank those of you who visited our table at the yard sale last weekend at The Falmouth Enterprise. There were lots of good deals to be found and every cent of every sale goes directly to the dogs. So, thank you all!

* * *

We are at the shelter Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to noon; Sunday from 3 to 5 PM; and Monday and Thursday afternoons from 4 to 6.

 
 

Back to the top.

 
 

Falmouth Enterprise web site.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
Home |  Our Dogs |  About Us |  Adopt a Dog |  Directions |  How to Help |  FFD Items |  Links

 
© 2005-2017, Friends of Falmouth Dogs. All rights reserved.
Site design and maintenance by Duck Web Design of Falmouth.